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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

1 edition of Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest found in the catalog.

Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest

Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest

terrestrial wildlife

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station in Fort Collins, CO .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Grazing -- Environmental aspects -- Southwest, New.,
  • Range management -- Southwest, New.,
  • Wildlife management -- Southwest, New.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPatrick W. Zwartjes ... [et al.].
    SeriesGeneral technical report RMRS -- GTR-142.
    ContributionsZwartjes, Patrick W., Rocky Mountain Research Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSF85.35.S88 A87 2005
    The Physical Object
    Pagination74 p. :
    Number of Pages74
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16136076M
    LC Control Number2006361724

      Over eight years we measured the effects of plant community composition, vegetation structure, and livestock grazing on occurrence of three grassland bird species—Western Meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris), and Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum)—at sites in central California during breeding season. In California’s Mediterranean-type . Other meta‐analyses have supported the idea that the effect of grazing on the plant community is highly species specific, benefiting certain native species and grasses, but negatively affecting exotics and flowering forbs (Stahlheber & D’Antonio ; Tälle et al. ). Although not tested here, there are likely significant changes in the.

    Grazing can have different impacts on an ecosystem including as a fire suppresant. USGS scientists are examining the effects of grazing in different environments to provide land resource managers with data they can use when determining grazing plans and actions. However, it decreased more strongly for native species (F = , d.f. = 53, P = for the interaction between native status and grazing effects on log biomass in mixtures; F = , d.f. = 53, P native status and grazing effects on log seed mass in mixture; Fig. 2b). As a result, native species declined.

    Use these book lists, teaching ideas, and free resources to teach students about popular November teaching themes such as Native American Heritage, the First Thanksgiving, and gratitude. Grade s K Plumb, G. and C. McMullen. Bison on the southwest Colorado Plateau: Conservation at the edge. The Southwestern Naturalist Ranglack, D.H. and J.T. duToit. Habitat selection by free-ranging bison is a mixed grazing system on public land. Rangeland Ecology and Management 68 .


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Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest Download PDF EPUB FB2

Assessment of Native Species and Ungulate Grazing in the Southwest: Terrestrial Wildlife The Authors _____ Patrick W. Zwartjes worked as a postdoctoral Research Wildlife Biologist with the Rocky Mountain Research Station in Albuquerque, NM, from to He received hisAuthor: Patrick W.

Zwartjes, Jean-Luc E. Cartron, Pamela L. Stoleson, Walter C. Haussamen, Tiffany E Cran. Get this from a library. Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest: terrestrial wildlife.

[Patrick W Zwartjes; Rocky Mountain Research Station (Fort Collins, Colo.);] -- "Range managers in the Southwestern States are increasingly being required to develop management strategies that take into consideration the conservation of wildlife populations.

Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest 74 p. (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Patrick W Zwartjes; Rocky Mountain Research Station (Fort.

BibTeX @MISC{States05assessmentof, author = {United States and Forest Service and Patrick W. Zwartjes and Jean-luc E.

Cartron and Pamela L. Stoleson and Walter C. Haussamen}, title = {Assessment of Native Species and Ungulate Grazing in the Southwest. BibTeX @MISC{Service05assessmentof, author = {Forest Service and Rocky Mountain and Patrick W.

Zwartjes and Jean-luc E. Cartron and Pamela L. Stoleson and Walter C. Haussamen and Tiffany E. Crane}, title = {Assessment of Native Species and Ungulate Grazing in the Southwest: Terrestrial Wildlife}, year = {}}.

Assessment of native species and ungulate grazing in the Southwest: Terrestrial wildlife Article in USDA Forest Service - General Technical Report RMRS-GTR October with 25 Reads. We tested the following two hypotheses: (1) ungulate grazing decreases plant species occurrence, and (2) decrease in occurrence caused by ungulate grazing becomes more pronounced with increasing.

1. Introduction. Herbivory by wild and domestic ungulates has profound effects on ecosystem patterns and processes in a variety of forest settings (Augustine and McNaughton,Pastor and Naiman,Riggs et al., ).The implications of herbivory effects on landscape management decisions are of interest to land managers and planners and have legal and policy.

Globally, new combinations of introduced and native plant and animal species have changed rangelands into novel ecosystems. Whereas many rangeland stakeholders (people who use or have an interest in rangelands) view intentional species introductions to improve forage and control erosion as beneficial, others focus on unintended costs, such as increased fire risk, loss of rangeland.

Wildlife Species Description and Significance. The Haida Gwaii Slug (Staala gwaii) was discovered in in Haida Gwaii (Queen Charlotte Islands) and has subsequently been found also on Brooks Peninsula, Vancouver Island, British areas harbour unique ecosystems and contain many rare species and subspecies as a result of the glacial history of the islands.

Responses of wild ungulate species to livestock grazing. Numbers of positive, negative, and neutral responses (extracted from 74 individual studies) are summarized for groups of similar species and grouped by diet type: browsers, intermediate mixed feeders, and grazers.

Families highlighted in orange are the non-ruminants. All others are ruminants. Assessment of the ecological implications of Namibian land resettlement by small-scale farmers suggests it is sustainable in the short term, with no savanna degradation due to bush encroachment. Grazing and rooting result in damage of ground cover and consumption of native plants.

The soil disturbance from these activities results in erosion and sediment run-off which damages coral reefs. Disturbed earth is also vulnerable to rooting of invasive plant species.

Southwest Indian, member of any of the Native American peoples inhabiting the southwestern United States; some scholars also include the peoples of northwestern Mexico in this culture area. More than 20 percent of Native Americans in the United States live in this region, principally in the present-day states of Arizona and New Mexico.

States but only shrubby in the Southwest have been excluded. In this handbook are descriptions and drawings of species of native trees of New Mexico and Arizona and 3 naturalized species, together with notes on several other species and important bo- tanical varieties, and drawings of 2.

Habitat degradation is responsible for the region-wide decline of several rare and listed species, including the burrowing owl, black-tailed prairie dog, mountain plover, Texas horned lizard, lesser prairie chicken, Arkansas darter and swift fox.

Ungulates, once hunted to low numbers or near extinction, have made a comeback in mountain forests. The brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii) is a species of rodent in the family is found in mountainous areas of Mexico and the western United States at altitudes over 2, m (6, ft). The species is threatened by continuing conversion of native grasslands to croplands, agricultural practices and the management of domestic livestock.

The species is of particular concern in much of its range in the United States, limiting future rescue. Occurrence Alberta, Saskatchewan. Status history Designated Endangered in April ter assessment of the specific states of knowledge and research needs.

This review also discusses how the evo-lutionary history of plant communities interacted with native ungulate grazing to shape responses to grazing by livestock.

Grasslands of the Great Plains have a long evolutionary history of grazing by bison. The impact of. More than half the land in the county is federally owned and managed, and much of it is leased for cattle grazing.

For two decades, environmental groups have sharply criticized the impact of grazing on the fragile ecosystems, complaining about muddied streams, forage denied to native species, and destruction of living soil on the rocks. species provenance (i.e. native vs. non-native). Interactions of grazing and climate The effects of livestock exclusion on biodiversity were depen-dent on temperature, but not precipitation (Fig.

4). Previous ecological models have described co-occurring gradients of herbivore pressure and environmental stress as driving shifts.One of those books is Common Southwestern Native Plants, An Identification Guide (MSRP $24) by Jack L.

Carter, Martha A. Carter and Donna J. Stevens. First published inthis paperback returned in a 2nd edition inan edition that offers a number of improvements over the first edition.We found that grazing, management treatments and time had significant three‐way interacting affects on lovegrass abundance (F 6, = 1088, P of native grasses (F 6, = 515, P species of native perennial grasses and five species of native annual.